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Old 02-21-2010, 12:45 AM
Nick_Richards Nick_Richards is offline
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Default HELPFUL HINT: Porsche Boxster Suspension Setup - Stock, BSX, BSR

Stock Suspension Setup
If you are running stock suspension you are probably not going to get more than -1.0 degrees of camber in the front. If you have the ROW (Rest of World) stock suspension you just might be able to get to -1.0.

Max out negative camber in the front. If you can get more than -1.0 in the front run -1.5 degrees in the rear. If you can't get more than -1.0 in the front run -1.2 in the rear.

If you are running both street and track you are probably going to want a little toe-in (1mm)* in the front to keep the car from wandering when driving on the street. 0mm would be a more aggressive setting if you are running mostly on the track. Run 2mm* of toe-in in the rear.

BSX Suspension Setup
We are assuming you are running the Bilstein PSS9 suspension, if not refer to stock suspension setup. Because the BSX rules don't allow front camber plates or GT3 lower control arms the amount of negative camber you can get in the front is limited. Running a lower ride height will help you get more negative camber. We run our BSX cars with a fairly low ride height in the front because of this (see pic below).

You should be able to get -1.5 to -1.8 degrees of camber in the front. Max out negative camber in the front and set toe-in to 0. Again, if you are using this car for the street as well you may want to run a little (1mm)* toe-in to reduce the amount of wander when driving on the street.

In the rear you want -1.5 to -2.0 degrees of camber, -1.8 is a good starting point with 2mm to 2.5mm* of toe-in with Tarett toe links, 3mm** with stock toe links.

We typically set the shock stiffness at 4/5 and very rarely make a change unless we are running at a very smooth or very rough track. Remember the majority of adjustment is realized at the end of the scale 1-3 or 7-9 so minor adjustments between 3 and 7 are difficult to feel.

A good starting point for sway bar settings is one off full soft (second hole from end of bar) in front GT3 bar and one full soft (hole closest to end of bar) on H&R bar or one off full stiff (third whole from end of bar) on Tarett. We like running the H&R bar on the BSX cars because of the extra weight (300 lbs) the BSX cars carry. If you are planning to move up to BSR it is probably better (i.e. cheaper) to go with the Tarett bar from the beginning as it gives a bit more adjustability with the lighter BSR cars.



Mike Harley, Team Driver #969

BSR Suspension Setup
A good baseline setup for a fully spec'd out BSR car with staggered wheels 225/255 is as follows:

Front:
3.2 - 3.7 degrees of negative camber depending on your setup. Stiffer sway bar settings will require more negative camber.
0mm toe-in, 1mm* if you feel the car is darting under heavy braking. This also may be necessary if you are running the square setup.
Swaybar (GT3) - one off full soft (second hole from end of bar)

Rear:
2.2 - 2.8 degrees of negative camber depending on your setup. Stiffer sway bar settings will require more negative camber.
2mm* - 2.5mm* of toe-in with Tarett rear toe link. 3mm** if you are running stock toe links.
Swaybar (Tarett) - one off full soft (second hole from end of bar)

*As measured from rim edge to edge horizontally based on on 17 inch wheels.
**Stock toe links have more movement under load so you need a bit more to-in to account for induced toe-out when suspension is under load. The solid monoball toe links reduce this effect.


Regan Steedman, Team Driver #979

Here's a little something extra - Regan's devious run up from DFL at Auto Club Speedway - hey if you can get away with it. Click here for video.

Troubleshooting Help
Symptom: Car feels loose or oversteers (i.e. back end wants to come around)
Solution: Either soften the rear (i.e. move closer to the end of bar) or stiffen the front (i.e. move farther from end of bar)

Symptom: Car tends to push or understeers
Solution: Either stiffen the rear(i.e. move farther from end of bar) or soften the front (i.e. move closer to the end of bar)

When making adjustments we typically start with the rear as it is a smaller adjustment because the rear bar is smaller. If more adjustment is needed return the rear to orginal position and move the front. When you are already at the end of the bar in the rear, obviously you don't have any other option but to move the front - in this case move the front one hole and then move the rear one hole in the opposite direction. Try not to make too drastic or too many changes at once.



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bilstein, boxster, bsr, bsx, camber, porsche, pss9, setup, stock, suspension, toe, toe in

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